Studying Colon Cancer? Use the C-DiGit® Scanner for Western Blots.

Cortactin (CTTN) is a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase involved in actin dynamics, and is overexpressed in several cancers. Phosphorylated cortactin (pTyr421) is required for cancer cell motility and invasion. This study demonstrates elevated expression of pTyr421-CTTN in primary colorectal tumors, with no change in mRNA levels. Curcumin (a natural compound derived from the spice turmeric) reduced association of CTTN with plasma membrane fractions in surface biotinylation, mass spectrometry, and Western blot experiments. Curcumin also decreased pTyr421-CTTN levels in certain cell lines.

Western blot analysis of cortactin, actin and GAPDH proteins

Figure 1. Western blot analysis of cortactin, actin and GAPDH proteins from DMSO and curcumin treated cell fractions of HCT116 cells. Total cell lysates were used to represent total protein input. Cytosolic and cytoskeletal proteins were extracted using Cell Fractionation kit (Cell Signaling, MA) and quantification of the blots are summarized in graphs. The images were scanned using C-Digit and quantified using Image Studio Digits (LI-COR Biosciences, NE). The data are expressed as a ratio to total protein (mean ± SD). * p<0.05 DMSO vs. curcumin; Student’s T-test. All images are representative of three independent experiments.

Quantitative chemiluminescent Westerns (using the LI-COR® C-DiGit Blot Scanner and SuperSignal® West Pico substrate) showed that curcumin treatment reduced CTTN levels in cytoskeletal fractions, and increased cytoplasmic localization. In Western blotting and immunofluorescent microscopy studies, curcumin induced dephosphorylation of cortactin by activation of the PTPN1 protein tyrosine phosphatase. Western blotting demonstrated that biotinylated curcumin directly binds to PTPN1, and that curcumin blocks the interaction between CTTN and p120 catenin. Curcumin inhibits cell migration in colon cancer cells overexpressing CTTN, and it holds promise as a colon cancer therapeutic.

Reference:

pTyr421 cortactin is overexpressed in colon cancer and is dephosphorylated by curcumin: involvement of non-receptor type 1 protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN1)
VM Radhakrishnan, P Kojs, G Young, R Ramalingam, B Jagadish, EA Mash, JD Martinez, FK Ghishan, PR Kiela
University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, Arizona; Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
PLoS ONE 9(1): e85796 (2014). 10.1371/journal.pone.0085796

Avoid Milk Blocking Buffer – Use NEW! Odyssey® Blocking Buffer (TBS)

Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS)

In previous posts, we’ve talked about Western blot blocking buffers and how important it is to optimize your blocking conditions to get the best results. As many of Western blot users do, you may just routinely use homemade TBS-milk blocking buffer. It’s inexpensive, and it does the job. . . well, most of the time. . .

What you may not know is using milk blocking buffer can cause issues with certain targets. This may give you the wrong information about the presence or the amount of your target. One good way to determine which blocking buffer system to use is to check to see what the primary antibody vendor recommends. Most recommend TBS-based buffer systems. If the primary antibody requires a TBS-based buffer system, we recommend new Odyssey™ Blocking Buffer (TBS).

When should you avoid milk blocking buffer?

  • When using anti-goat secondary antibodies.
    • Reason: Milk contains bovine IgG. Anti-goat secondary antibodies may recognize bovine IgG, resulting in high background.
  • When detecting phosphorylated proteins.
    • Reason: Milk contains phosphorylated proteins, which may result in low to no signal and high background.
  • When using streptavidin-biotin detection systems.
    • Reason: Milk contains endogenous levels of biotin. Streptavidin will detect this, resulting in high background.

OBB TBS and milkHere are the results of an experiment evaluating the use of milk and Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS). As you can see, milk masked the detection of this protein and is not a good blocking buffer choice.

Figure 1. Effect of various blocking agents on detection of pAkt and total Akt in Jurkat lysate after stimulation by calyculin A. Total and phosphorylated Akt were detected in calyculin A-stimulated (+) and non-stimulated (-) Jurkat lysate at 10 µg; 5 µg; and 2.5 µg/well. Blots were probed with pAkt Rabbit mAb (Santa Cruz P/N sc‑135650) and Akt mAb (CST P/N 2967) and detected with IRDye® 800CW Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI‑COR P/N 926-32211) and IRDye 680RD Goat anti-Mouse IgG (LI‑COR P/N 926‑68070); scanned on Odyssey® CLx (auto scan 700 & 800). pAkt (green) is only detected with Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS).

So be sure to optimize your Western blot blocking conditions! The time you spend finding the best blocker will be worth it – and save you from making the wrong conclusions about your experimental data in the future.