Article Category: Applications

Use Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes for Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution Studies

In Vivo Imaging with NIR Fluorescent ProbesNon-invasive preclinical imaging methods are critical for development of imaging agents and targeted therapeutics. Pharmacokinetics is the study of what the body does to a drug with respect to biodistribution and clearance. Traditionally-used radiolabeled probes have limitations such as cost, access, and safety. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging offers a powerful alternative to radiolabeled probes for pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies. NIR fluorescent optical imaging agents can be used to image the whole animal over time. And, more than one agent can be tracked in the same animal if each agent is labeled with a spectrally-distinct fluorophore.

In this webinar, Dr Amy Geschwender examines several case studies from the literature, and discusses:

  • Why NIR fluorescent probes are widely used for in vivo imaging
  • How fluorescence imaging of excised tissues and tissue sections is used to examine biodistribution in more detail
  • How to measure serum half-life and % injected dose per gram with NIR fluorescent probes

This webinar features data from the Pearl® Small Animal Imaging System, which was recently honored by Frost & Sullivan, in addition to advancements in NIR technology. Click here to learn more about this award.

Visit our website to learn more about BrightSite™ Optical Imaging Agents and IRDye® infrared dyes that can be used for your pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies.

Use NEW! VRDye™ Secondary Antibodies to Correlate Near-Infrared Application Data with Microscopy and Flow Cytometry Data

VRDye Secondary Antibody IconsLI-COR is expanding its portfolio of reagents by offering VRDye™ 490, VRDye 549, and IRDye® 650 dye-labeled secondary antibodies and protein labeling kits. These new secondaries can be used for for a variety of applications, including immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Just like our IRDye dye-labeled secondary antibodies, these new visible fluorescence antibodies are highly cross-adsorbed. The dyes are conjugated to the same antibodies as the existing IRDye secondary antibodies, which are used for Western blotting and In-Cell Western™ Assay applications. This gives researchers the ability to correlate microscopy and flow data with Western blot and cell-based assay data. The VRDye secondary antibodies are suitable for multiplex experiments when combined with other secondary antibodies labeled with proper fluorescent dyes and using instrumentation with appropriate excitation and detection capabilities.

Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin protein in HeLa cells.

Figure 1. Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin protein in HeLa cells. Cells were cultured on cover slips. After fixation and permeabilization, cells were incubated with rabbit anti-tubulin mAb (CST), followed by VRDye™ 490 Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI-COR P/N 926-49020). Nuclei were stained with DAPI. Image acquired with Olympus IX81 microscope.

Immunohistochemistry staining of EGFR protein on F98-EGFR tumor slides.

Figure 2. Immunohistochemistry staining of EGFR protein on F98-EGFR tumor slides. F98-EGFR tumors were snap-frozen in O.C.T. ™ compound and sectioned at 4-µm thickness. After fixation and permeabilization, cells were incubated with rabbit anti-EGFR mAb (CST), followed by detection with VRDye™ 549 Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI-COR P/N 926-54020). DAPI was used to stain the nuclei. Image acquired on Olympus IX81 microscope.

In addition, many researchers use labeled primary antibodies for flow cytometry. LI-COR now offers visible fluorescent dye protein labeling kits that are ideal for customers who need to label custom monoclonal antibodies for this application.

Visit our website for more information on these new visible fluorescence antibodies and protein labeling kits or to order them for your research.

Rethinking the Traditional Western Blot

Traditional Western blotting is a labor-intensive process that includes gel electrophoresis, protein transfer to a blotting membrane, incubation with primary and secondary antibodies, and chemiluminescent or fluorescent detection of target proteins. (View a typical Western blotting workflow.) Day-to-day reproducibility is poor, because small variations in lysate preparation, gel loading, electrophoresis, transfer, and detection are unavoidable sources of technical variability.

Snapshot of In-Cell Western Assay MethodThe In-Cell Western™ (ICW) Assay, a quantitative immunofluorescent method, is an alternative to traditional Western blots that increases both reproducibility and sample throughput. (View a typical ICW workflow.)

We recently hosted a webinar called “Rethinking the Traditional Western Blot”, during which John Lyssand, PhD, from LI-COR Biosciences, discussed the In-Cell Western Assay and its use in neuroscience research, in this case, Alzheimer’s Disease. The In-Cell Western Assay enables screening and analysis of many more samples in each experiment, eliminates error-prone protocol steps, and delivers higher reproducibility for biological and technical replicates.

ICW Use: Tau Protein Accumulation and InhibitionThe data presented demonstrated how ICW assays were used in Alzheimer’s Disease research to screen HSP90 inhibitors for their effectiveness in reducing tau activity levels. Dr Lyssand discussed how and why the In-Cell Western Assay is superior to traditional methods for screening of cell samples.

If you didn’t have a chance to join us in September for “Rethinking the Traditional Western blot”, you can view this webinar online and on-demand. Check out the information on In-Cell Western assays on our website. You can also read Professor Dickey’s white paper outlining how he and his group used In-Cell Western Assays to study Alzhemier’s Disease.

New Cell Stain Increases Ease of Use for In-Cell Western™ Normalization

CellTag 700 Stain ICW Kits for Quantitative Cell Signaling AnalysisHave you ever wanted to try an in-cell ELISA but you just weren’t sure how to get started? With the new LI-COR® CellTag™ 700 Stain, a near-infrared fluorescent, non-specific cell stain that provides accurate normalization to cell number, you have a easier — and more affordable — way to try this powerful application. The CellTag 700 Stain accumulates in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of permeabilized cells, and provides linear fluorescent signal across a wide range of cell types and cell numbers (see Figure 1 below). CellTag 700 Stain is applied to the cells during incubation with IRDye® 800CW secondary antibody, and enables accurate measurement of target protein levels with much higher throughput than Western blotting.

CellTag 700 Stain - Linear Relationship between Fluorescence and Cell Number.

Figure 1. Linear Relationship between Fluorescence and Cell Number. Two-fold serial dilutions of A431 and NIH/3T3 cells were plated in 96-well plate, then fixed, permeabilized, stained with CellTag 700 Normalization Stain, and detected with Odyssey Classic (Resolution: 169um; Quality: medium; Focus offset: 4.0mm; Intensity: 5). The Trim Signals were used to generate the graphs.

CellTag 700 Stain ICW Kits offer a convenient way to try cell-based In-Cell Western Assays. Each kit includes blocking buffer, IRDye® 800CW secondary antibody for detection of a specific protein target in the 800 nm channel, and CellTag 700 Stain to normalize well-to-well variations in cell number. This cost-effective normalization method makes quantification of the target protein more precise.
In-Cell Western Normalization with CellTag 700 Stain in EGF-stimulated A431 Cells.Figure 2. In-Cell Western Assay with CellTag 700 Stain in EGF-stimulated A431 Cells. (go to the CellTag 700 Stain Overview page for more details on this data).

Try one of our new In-Cell Western Assay Kits with CellTag 700 Stain today and find out just how easy it is to perform fast, cost-effective cell-based Western assays.

Journal Articles Citing Use of Odyssey® and Pearl® Imaging Systems and Near-Infrared Fluorescence

Affibody-DyLight Conjugates for in vivo Assessment of HER2 Expression by Near-Infrared Optical Imaging.

Zielinski R, M Hassan, I Lyakhov, D Needle, V Chernomordik, A Garcia-Glaessner, Y Ardeshirpour, J Capala and A Gandjbakhche
Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
PLoS ONE 7(7): e41016 (2012). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041016

The HER2/neu gene is overexpressed in ~20% of invasive breast carcinomas. in vivo assessment of HER2 levels would aid development of HER2-targeted therapies and perhaps assist in selection of appropriate treatment strategies. This study describes HER2-specific probes for in vivo monitoring of receptor levels by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging. Affibody molecules were labeled with DyLight750 dye, and affinity and specificity were confirmed in vitro. in vivo, Affibody-DyLight probes accumulated in HER2-positive breast cancer xenografts, but not in HER2-negative xenografts.

Fluorescent images were acquired at different time intervals after probe injection.

Fluorescent images were acquired at different time intervals after probe injection. Mouse bearing BT-474 xenograft tumor was injected with 10 µg HER2-Affibody-DyLight750 conjugate. Images were acquired every second for 1 minute with Pearl Impulse Imager (LI-COR Biosciences). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041016.s004

Animals were imaged with a custom NIR fluorescence-lifetime imaging system. The Pearl® Impulse Imager (LI-COR Biosciences) was used to monitor real-time accumulation of the Affibody probe in HER2-positive tumors during very early time points. Probe was injected during image acquisition, and images were captured every second for 1 minute. Probe accumulation in the kidney first, followed by tumor accumulation. Tumor fluorescence could still be detected 5 days after probe injection. This Affibody conjugate is useful for preclinical monitoring of HER2 status, and may have clinical utility.


Disruption of Kv1.3 Channel Forward Vesicular Trafficking by Hypoxia in Human T Lymphocytes

AA Chimote, Z Kuras, and L Conforti
Departments of Internal Medicine and Molecular & Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
Journal of Biological Chemistry 287(3): 2055-67 (2012) DOI 10.1074/jbc.M111.274209

In solid tumors, hypoxia decreases immune surveillance. Kv1.3 channels on T lymphocytes are down-regulated by an unknown mechanism, inhibiting T cell function. The authors hypothesize that changes in membrane trafficking cause reduced expression of Kv1.3 at the cell surface. On-Cell Western cell based assays (Odyssey® Imager, LI-COR Biosciences) were extensively used to measure cell surface expression of Kv1.3.

Chronic hypoxia decreased cell surface expression of Kv1.3 in Jurkat cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis, degradation, or endocytosis did not block this effect. However, inhibition of forward trafficking in the trans-Golgi with brefeldin A (BFA) prevented hypoxia-induced reduction of Kv1.3 cell surface expression. Confocal microscopy confirmed retention of Kv1.3 in the trans-Golgi. Quantitative fluorescent Westerns (Odyssey Imager) demonstrated that expression of AP-1, which is required for clathrin-coated vesicle formation, is downregulated by hypoxia. These data indicate that chronic hypoxia disrupts clathrin-mediated forward trafficking of Kv1.3, thereby reducing immune surveillance by T cells.


Sequential Application of Anticancer Drugs Enhances Cell Death by Rewiring Apoptotic Signaling Networks

M Lee, A Ye, A Gardino, A Hheijink, P Sorger, G MacBeath, and M Yaffe
Dept of Biology, David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
Cell 149:780-794 (2012). doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.03.031

Historically, standard treatments for human malignancies have been single drug therapies that cause DNA damage. Systems-based approaches and network analysis are now being used to examine how signaling can be re-wired by drug treatments that target dynamic network states. This study suggests that the timing and order of administration of certain drug combinations increases treatment effectiveness. Lee et al. pre-treated cells with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, prior to DNA-damaging chemotherapy drugs.

Pre-treatment with erlotinib (an EGFR inhibitor) sensitized triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) to the DNA damage agent doxorubicin, and cell death increased by nearly 500%. Sensitization occurred only if the drugs were given sequentially. Transcriptional, proteomic, and computational analysis of signaling networks showed that dynamic network re-wiring was responsible for sensitization. Quantitative Westerns (Odyssey Imager; high-density, 48-sample blots) were used to monitor systems-level signaling dynamics. Erlotinib treatment made cells more susceptible to DNA damage by reactivating an apoptotic pathway that had been suppressed.


Investigation of Ovarian Cancer Associated Sialylation Changes in N-linked Glycopeptides by Quantitative Proteomics

V Shetty, J Hafner, P Shah, Z Nickens, and R Philip
Immunotope, Inc., Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA
Clinical Proteomics 9:10 (2012) doi:10.1186/1559-0275-9-10.

CA125 is currently used as a biomarker for ovarian cancer, but is ineffective for detection of early stage disease. Previous research indicates that the level of sialic acid in total serum of ovarian cancer patients is elevated. Based on that idea, the authors suggest using N-linked sialyated glycopeptides as potential targets for early stage ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

Shetty et al. used Lectin-directed Tandem Lableing (LTL) and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics to investigate N-linked sialyated glycopeptides, and identified 10 that were up-regulated in serum from ovarian cancer patients. Quantitative Western blot analysis of lectin-enriched glycoproteins (Odyssey Imager) was used to confirm the proteomic analysis. In ovarian cancer, increased sialylation of haptoglobin, PON1, and Zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein was observed. Cancer-specific sialylation of glycopeptides may be a target for biomarker discovery.


Check out some of our Publications Lists for:

Analyze Glycoproteins with Sensitive, Quantitative Infrared Fluorescent Techniques

O-Linked Glycan StructureGlycosylation is one of the most common and important events in post-translational modification. Over half of all proteins are believed to be glycosylated, and the resulting glycoconjugates play an important role in many biological processes. They have been connected to instances of cancer development, retrovirus infection, and other diseases. In an effort to understand these diseases, glycoprotein analysis has become a growing area of research. (See examples of typical glycan structures.)

Analysis of glycoproteins requires sensitive and quantitative applications. LI-COR offers a single, optimized solution using the Odyssey® Systems and IRDye® labeled conjugates. This solution provides sensitive and quantitative results using two-color near-infrared detection at 700 nm and 800 nm wavelengths. Operating at this wavelength produces lower background from biological materials, buffer components, and standard membranes used in Western blotting and lectin binding applications and, thus, superior data.

Outlined below are a variety of applications for several one-color, visible glycoprotein applications that have been adapted to near-infrared fluorescence detection on an Odyssey Imaging System:

Read Glycoprotein Detection with the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for more indepth information on using your Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for glycobiology research.

Create a Complete Molecular Imaging Workstation

Combining the Odyssey® CLx Infrared Imaging System with the Pearl® Impulse Small Animal Imaging System creates a versatile workstation for in vivo and in vitro imaging.

BrightSite™ Optical Imaging Agents or probes developed using IRDye® infrared dyes can be used for in vitro, in vivo, and tissue imaging. This technology offers researchers the ability to take research from the cell to the animal, all within one lab.

Odyssey CLx Infrared Imaging System Capabilities:

Pearl Impulse Small Animal Imaging Capabilities:

Validation Workflow and Molecular Imaging WorkstationFigure 1. Validation and Use of an IRDye Fluorescent Probe. After probe labeling, in vitro cellular assays and microscopy are used to confirm specificity. The desired target is then imaged in animals. Excised organs and tissues can be examined for more detailed localization of the probe. Animal image captured with Pearl Impulse. A more comprehensive discussion of approaches for the development of fluorescent contrast agents has also been published. Reference: Kovar, et al. Anal Biochem 367(2007) 1-12.

Molecular imaging – achieved with near-infrared fluorescent technology from LI-COR!

NEW! IRDye® Goat Anti-Mouse IgM Secondary Antibodies from LI-COR®!

IRDye Dye-labeled Goat anti-Mouse AntibodiesOur IRDye secondary antibody line is growing! We have recently added IRDye Goat anti-Mouse IgM (μ chain specific) secondaries labeled with:

Just like all of the LI-COR IRDye secondary antibodies, these are highly cross-adsorbed secondary antibody conjugates suitable for a variety of applications (see the table below).

IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies are the antibodies of choice for a wide variety of applications in the 800 nm channel (see the list below). IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies can be used for 2-color detection when multiplexed with IRDye 680RD or IRDye 680LT secondary antibodies.

IRDye 680RD secondary antibodies are the antibodies of choice for In-Cell Western Assay and Western blot applications in the 700 nm channel. These antibodies can be used for 2-color detection when multiplexed with IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies. These antibodies are our most universal use 700 nm channel antibodies.

IRDye 680LT secondary antibodies have been proven the brightest signal for Western blot detection in the 700 nm channel and are comparable to Alexa Fluor 680 secondary antibodies. They are an excellent choice for low abundance targets and can be used for 2-color detection when multiplexed with IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies.

Application IRDye 800CW Secondaries IRDye 680RD Secondaries IRDye 680LT Secondaries
Western Blot
In-Cell Western™ Assay Not Recommended
On-Cell Western Assay Not Recommended
Protein Array
Immunohistochemistry
Microscopy
2D Gel Detection
Tissue Section Imaging
Small Animal Imaging Not Recommended
Virus Titration Assay Not Known Not Known
FRET-based Assay Not Known Not Known

To order, visit our online catalog.

Is DNA Gel Documentation Important to You?

If so, do you know that the Odyssey® Fc Dual-Mode Imaging System now offers you the advantage of imaging DNA gels stained with ethidium bromide (EtBr), SYBR® Safe, and many other DNA stains using the 600 nm channel? How about that for multi-functionality?!

DNA or nucleic acid gel documentation is a common technique performed in the lab. Ethidium bromide is a common DNA stain. But, like many, if you are using SYTO® 60 as a near-infrared fluorescent DNA stain, then you can image your nucleic acid gel in the 700 nm channel of the Odyssey CLx, Odyssey Sa, OR Odyssey Fc. The detection sensitivity and lower limit of detection for SYTO 60 with any of these Odyssey imaging systems has proven to be better than with ethidium bromide detected with either a Polaroid camera or a CCD imaging system.

Don’t believe it? Check the data below, we think you may like what you see. In the figure below, DNA Gels imaged on the Odyssey Fc using Ethidium Bromide, SYBR Safe and SYTO 60. The Ethidium Bromide gel was also documented using Polaroid to show the comparison.
DNA Gels imaged on the Odyssey Fc using Ethidium Bromide, SYBR Safe and SYTO 60. All were imaged on the Odyssey Fc Imaging System.

Check out our technical notes on DNA gel documentation:
Imaging Nucleic Acid Gels on the Odyssey Fc Imaging System
SYTO 60 Staining of Nucleic Acids in Gels

Odyssey® Sa: the Economical Imager Solution for Quantitative IR Westerns and Plate-based Assays

Odyssey Sa Infrared Imaging System
Is your capital equipment budget money tight? (when isn’t it, right?) Well, if you want to do quantitative infrared Western blotting AND plate-based assays, you should consider the economical Odyssey Sa Infrared Imaging System. Less expensive than the multi-functional, supports-more-than-20 applications Odyssey CLx Infrared Imaging System, the Odyssey Sa still gives you the power of infrared fluorescent technology for accurate, sensitive protein quantification.

Odyssey Sa with BioTek BioStacker Microplate StackerPLUS if you need plate-based assay automation, the Odyssey Sa is perfect! With the Odyssey Sa Express Automation Software and either a 30-plate or 50-plate BioTek® BioStack™ Microplate Stacker (BioStack2WR), your lab’s throughput can increase dramatically. The barcode reader accessory (P/N 9260-61) may be added to any Odyssey Sa System for plate tracking.

If you would like a demo or more information, please let us know by completing this form.

As a summary, the Odyssey Sa Infrared Imaging System includes:

For additional information, refer to the Odyssey Sa Infrared Imaging System Brochure.

Get the Power of Infrared Technology at an Affordable Price! Happy Researching!