Article Category: Proteomics Applications

The Pivotal Role of Validation in Optical Probe Development

Underlying every successful clinical application of fluorescent probes is a rigorous, strategic probe validation process. Previous blog posts have discussed the importance of probe specificity, binding affinity, and distribution, and the validation process is where these and other parameters are determined. Given the time and expenses involved in clinical translation, efficient and accurate probe validation is essential.

A Systematic Approach to Developing and Validating Optical Imaging Contrast Agents

In a foundational 2007 article published in Analytical Biochemistry, Kovar et.al. demonstrated the principal steps involved in developing fluorescent optical probes suitable for human clinical use. The authors began with a comprehensive review of NIR fluorochromes, such as IRDye® 800CW, and targets and ligands for fluorescent optical probes, including monoclonal antibodies, tumor surface proteins, peptides, and small molecules. Steps for development and validation described in the remainder of the article are “applicable to any dye-conjugated optical agent,” demonstrating the versatility of this systematic approach [1].

STEP 1: CONJUGATION

The first step in probe development is the conjugation of target and NIR fluorochrome. In this study, the authors conjugated IRDye 800CW to five commercial epidermal growth factor (EGF) sources in equivalent ratios and evaluated signal intensity via the In-Cell Western™ (ICW) assay method. ICW imaging demonstrated variation between the signal strength of each EGF source. Because “Variations in signal strength measured in this fashion have the potential to predict probe performance in vivo,” choosing the correct target for conjugation is a critical first step [1].

STEP 2: SPECIFICITY AND BINDING AFFINITY VALIDATION IN VITRO

Prior to animal imaging, probe specificity and binding affinity are validated in vitro. Here, the authors again chose the In-Cell Western (cytoblot) method to evaluate IRDye 800CW EGF for binding specificity. Specifically, PC3M-LN4 and 22Rv1 human prostate adenocarcinoma cells were cultured in microtiter plates and were “treated with serial dilutions of labeled EGF to verify a high affinity binding of EGFR-targeted dye” [1]. Specificity was then determined by blocking access of EGF to the EGF receptor with an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, and by competition with unlabeled EGF [1]. The authors concluded that “Characterization of the targeting agent in a cell-based assay can simplify probe development,” and that although “success in a cell-based assay format does not guarantee performance in vivo, failure at this step is generally predictive of failure in the animal” [1].

Learn more about the In-Cell Western Method.

STEP 3: SPECIFICITY, DISTRIBUTION, AND CLEARANCE VALIDATION IN VIVO

Next, the authors validated probe specificity and clearance in vivo in living mice. This is the process of determining probe uptake by the target vs surrounding tissues, the rate at which the probe is expelled from the organism, and the probe to background ratio in the body of mice. First, clearance kinetics of unconjugated IRDye 800CW were established. Then, clearance measurements for IRDye 800CW-anti-EGFR antibody conjugates were established in mice bearing PC3M-LN4 subcutaneous or orthotopic tumors to ensure the conjugate did not accumulate non-specifically in the mouse. This interaction between clearance kinetics and specificity can impact in vivo analysis by falsely indicating tumor tissue in pooled optical probe in the liver or kidneys.

STEP 4: EX VIVO VALIDATION IN EXCISED TISSUE SAMPLES

Lastly, the PC3M-LN4 tumors were excised and injected intravenously with IRDye 800CW EGF or pre-injected with C225 anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody prior to dosing with IRDye 800CW EGF for ex vivo analysis. After imaging, the distribution of the IRDye probe was assessed and fluorescence signal area was determined against a control, optical agent only, and C225 competition.

The authors ultimately concluded that “Fluorochrome-labeled molecular probes are valuable tools for non-invasive longitudinal study of tumorigenesis and metastasis, preclinical studies of the effects of therapeutic agents, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of drug-target interactions” [1]. Since this paper was published over a decade ago, IRDye labeled molecular probes have been featured in more than 20 clinical trials around the world.

EGFR-Specific Optical Probes Improve EGFRvIII-Targeted Molecular Imaging

In a 2014 study published in Cancer Biology & Therapy, Gong et.al. demonstrated an application of structured probe validation. In this investigative study, the authors created and validated the specificity, binding affinity, distribution, and clearance of three EFGRvIII-targeted fluorescent optical probes. An EFGR-specific affibody, the therapeutic antibody panitumumab, and an EGF ligand were conjugated with IRDye 800CW to create three probes: Aff800, Pan800, and EGF800. The experimental target was rat glioma cell line F98, a known over-expresser of EGFR. A control assay contained EGFR expression-devoid F98 parent (F98-p) cells, and two experimental assays contained F98-derived transgenic cells expressing EGFR or EGFR-vIII. Each probe was compared with each cell-based assay and imaged for comparison, creating a total of nine experimental conditions.

Comparison of specificity and binding affinity between the experimental conditions was performed in cell-based assays using the In-Cell Western method. All three probes successfully bound to F98-EGFR, and Pan800 and Aff800 bound to F-98vIII. Signal intensity was also compared in the nine conditions to assess if binding was dose-dependent. The authors concluded “Little signal was detected when Aff800 and Pan800 were incubated with F98-p [the expression-devoid parent cells], indicating that their interactions with F98-EGFR and F98-vIII is highly specific” [2].

Next, probe target specificity to EGFR- and EGFRvIII-expressing tumors and clearance profiles were assessed in vivo. Mice with F98-p, F98-EGFR, and F98-vIII xenograft tumors were injected with the three probes and imaged with the Pearl® Impulse Small Animal Imaging System (LI-COR Biosciences). Fluorescent signal to background ratio for each of the nine probe-tumor conditions were assessed, again revealing highly specific interactions between Aff800 and Pan800 with F98-EGFR and F98-vIII expressing tumors. EGF-800 signal was high in F98-EGFR tumors, corroborating cell based assay results.

Lastly, tumor-containing organs were dissected and imaged ex vivo, validating the previously-measured fluorescence signals and assessing probe distribution in targets. This last step in validation was consistent with in vitro scans, again demonstrating Aff800 and Pan800 affinity to F98-EGFR and F98-vIII tumors. Based on these results, Aff800 and Pan800 may be valuable in “imaging of heterogenous tumors containing both versions of receptors” (EGFR, EGFRvIII) [2]. Alternatively, due to optimal clearance kinetics, Aff800 EGF800 is preferable in scenarios where imaging must be performed within a short time after probe administration” [2].

Conclusion

This example from Gong et.al. demonstrates how different optical probes may be used to assess different tumor properties. Additionally, the authors showed how structured approach to optical probe validation successively builds proof of probe parameters and provides several spots for go/no-go decision-making. Proof of probe parameters are critical for clinical application, and clear decision points provide efficiency and allow for early determination if a probe is worth exploring further.

Do you think IRDye dye-labeled probes could be used in your research? LI-COR Custom Services include chemistry and probe conjugation, biological assay services, translational services, and manufacturing, including cGMP manufacturing. Request a free project evaluation today.

REFERENCES

  1. Kovar, J. L., Simpson, M. A., Geschwender, A., & Olive, D. M. (2007, August 1). A Systematic Approach to the Development of Fluorescent Contrast Agents for Optical Imaging of Mouse Cancer Models. Analytical Biochemistry, 367(1), 1-12. doi:10.1016/j.ab.2007.04.011
  2. Gong, H., Kovar, J. L., Cheung, L., Rosenthal, E. L., & Olive, D. M. (2014, February). A Comparative Study of Affibody, Panitumumab, and EGF for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of EGFR- and EGFRvIII-expressing Tumors. Cancer Biology & Therapy, 15(2), 185-193. doi:10.4161/cbt.26719

Use NEW! VRDye™ Secondary Antibodies to Correlate Near-Infrared Application Data with Microscopy and Flow Cytometry Data

VRDye Secondary Antibody IconsLI-COR is expanding its portfolio of reagents by offering VRDye™ 490, VRDye 549, and IRDye® 650 dye-labeled secondary antibodies and protein labeling kits. These new secondaries can be used for for a variety of applications, including immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Just like our IRDye dye-labeled secondary antibodies, these new visible fluorescence antibodies are highly cross-adsorbed. The dyes are conjugated to the same antibodies as the existing IRDye secondary antibodies, which are used for Western blotting and In-Cell Western™ Assay applications. This gives researchers the ability to correlate microscopy and flow data with Western blot and cell-based assay data. The VRDye secondary antibodies are suitable for multiplex experiments when combined with other secondary antibodies labeled with proper fluorescent dyes and using instrumentation with appropriate excitation and detection capabilities.

Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin protein in HeLa cells.

Figure 1. Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin protein in HeLa cells. Cells were cultured on cover slips. After fixation and permeabilization, cells were incubated with rabbit anti-tubulin mAb (CST), followed by VRDye™ 490 Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI-COR P/N 926-49020). Nuclei were stained with DAPI. Image acquired with Olympus IX81 microscope.

Immunohistochemistry staining of EGFR protein on F98-EGFR tumor slides.

Figure 2. Immunohistochemistry staining of EGFR protein on F98-EGFR tumor slides. F98-EGFR tumors were snap-frozen in O.C.T. ™ compound and sectioned at 4-µm thickness. After fixation and permeabilization, cells were incubated with rabbit anti-EGFR mAb (CST), followed by detection with VRDye™ 549 Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI-COR P/N 926-54020). DAPI was used to stain the nuclei. Image acquired on Olympus IX81 microscope.

In addition, many researchers use labeled primary antibodies for flow cytometry. LI-COR now offers visible fluorescent dye protein labeling kits that are ideal for customers who need to label custom monoclonal antibodies for this application.

Visit our website for more information on these new visible fluorescence antibodies and protein labeling kits or to order them for your research.

Rethinking the Traditional Western Blot

Traditional Western blotting is a labor-intensive process that includes gel electrophoresis, protein transfer to a blotting membrane, incubation with primary and secondary antibodies, and chemiluminescent or fluorescent detection of target proteins. (View a typical Western blotting workflow.) Day-to-day reproducibility is poor, because small variations in lysate preparation, gel loading, electrophoresis, transfer, and detection are unavoidable sources of technical variability.

Snapshot of In-Cell Western Assay MethodThe In-Cell Western™ (ICW) Assay, a quantitative immunofluorescent method, is an alternative to traditional Western blots that increases both reproducibility and sample throughput. (View a typical ICW workflow.)

We recently hosted a webinar called “Rethinking the Traditional Western Blot”, during which John Lyssand, PhD, from LI-COR Biosciences, discussed the In-Cell Western Assay and an example of its use in neuroscience research, in this case, Alzheimer’s Disease. The In-Cell Western Assay enables screening and analysis of many more samples in each experiment, eliminates error-prone protocol steps, and delivers higher reproducibility for biological and technical replicates.

ICW Use: Tau Protein Accumulation and InhibitionThe data presented demonstrated how ICW assays were used in Alzheimer’s Disease research to screen HSP90 inhibitors for their effectiveness in reducing tau activity levels. Dr Lyssand discussed how and why the In-Cell Western Assay is superior to traditional methods for screening of cell samples.

If you didn’t have a chance to join us in September for “Rethinking the Traditional Western blot”, you can view this webinar online and on-demand. Check out the information on In-Cell Western assays on our website. You can also read Professor Dickey’s white paper as cited above that outlines how he and his group used higher throughput method to study Alzheimer’s Disease.

New Cell Stain Increases Ease of Use for In-Cell Western™ Normalization

CellTag 700 Stain ICW Kits for Quantitative Cell Signaling AnalysisHave you ever wanted to try an in-cell ELISA but you just weren’t sure how to get started? With the new LI-COR® CellTag™ 700 Stain, a near-infrared fluorescent, non-specific cell stain that provides accurate normalization to cell number, you have a easier — and more affordable — way to try this powerful application. CellTag 700 Stain accumulates in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of permeabilized cells, and provides linear fluorescent signal across a wide range of cell types and cell numbers (see Figure 1 below). CellTag 700 Stain is applied to the cells during incubation with IRDye® 800CW secondary antibody, and enables accurate measurement of target protein levels with much higher throughput than Western blotting.

CellTag 700 Stain - Linear Relationship between Fluorescence and Cell Number.

Figure 1. Linear Relationship between Fluorescence and Cell Number. Two-fold serial dilutions of A431 and NIH/3T3 cells were plated in 96-well plate, then fixed, permeabilized, stained with CellTag 700 Stain, and detected with Odyssey Classic (Resolution: 169um; Quality: medium; Focus offset: 4.0mm; Intensity: 5). The Trim Signals were used to generate the graphs.

CellTag 700 Stain ICW Kits offer a convenient way to try cell-based In-Cell Western Assays. Each kit includes blocking buffer, IRDye® 800CW secondary antibody for detection of a specific protein target in the 800 nm channel, and CellTag 700 Stain to normalize well-to-well variations in cell number. This cost-effective normalization method makes quantification of the target protein more precise.
In-Cell Western Normalization with CellTag 700 Stain in EGF-stimulated A431 Cells.Figure 2. In-Cell Western Assay with CellTag 700 Stain in EGF-stimulated A431 Cells. (Go to the CellTag 700 Stain Overview page for more details on this data).

Try one of our new In-Cell Western Assay Kits with CellTag 700 Stain today and find out just how easy it is to perform fast, cost-effective cell-based Western assays.

Analyze Glycoproteins with Sensitive, Quantitative Infrared Fluorescent Techniques

O-Linked Glycan StructureGlycosylation is one of the most common and important events in post-translational modification. Over half of all proteins are believed to be glycosylated, and the resulting glycoconjugates play an important role in many biological processes. They have been connected to instances of cancer development, retrovirus infection, and other diseases. In an effort to understand these diseases, glycoprotein analysis has become a growing area of research. (See examples of typical glycan structures.)

Analysis of glycoproteins requires sensitive and quantitative applications. LI-COR offers a single, optimized solution using the Odyssey® Systems and IRDye® labeled conjugates to analyze glycoproteins. This solution provides sensitive and quantitative results using two-color near-infrared detection at 700 nm and 800 nm wavelengths. Operating at this wavelength produces lower background from biological materials, buffer components, and standard membranes used in Western blotting and lectin binding applications and, thus, superior data.

Outlined below are a variety of applications for several one-color, visible glycoprotein applications that have been adapted to near-infrared fluorescence detection on an Odyssey Imaging System:

Read Glycoprotein Detection with the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for more indepth information on using your Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for glycobiology research.

NEW! IRDye® Goat Anti-Mouse IgM Secondary Antibodies from LI-COR®!

IRDye Dye-labeled Goat anti-Mouse AntibodiesOur IRDye secondary antibody line is growing! We have recently added IRDye Goat anti-Mouse IgM (μ chain specific) secondaries labeled with:

  • IRDye 800CW (PN 926-32280)
  • IRDye 680RD (PN 926-68180) or
  • IRDye 680LT (PN 926-68080).

Just like all of the LI-COR IRDye secondary antibodies, these are highly cross-adsorbed secondary antibody conjugates suitable for a variety of applications (see the table below).

IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies are the antibodies of choice for a wide variety of applications in the 800 nm channel (see the list below). IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies can be used for 2-color detection when multiplexed with IRDye 680RD or IRDye 680LT secondary antibodies.

IRDye 680RD secondary antibodies are the antibodies of choice for In-Cell Western Assay and Western blot applications in the 700 nm channel. These antibodies can be used for 2-color detection when multiplexed with IRDye 800CW secondary antibodies. These antibodies are our most universal use 700 nm channel antibodies. Start using IRDye 680RD first over other 700 nm dyes. Dilution working range 1:10,000 – 1:40,000.

IRDye 680LT secondary antibodies have been proven the brightest signal for Western blot detection in the 700 nm channel and are comparable to Alexa Fluor 680 secondary antibodies. Choose IRDye 680LT secondary antibodies to get high signal and for specific uses of detection in the 700nm channel. These antibodies are not recommended when getting up and running on system. Once established near-infrared protocols are optimized with IRDye 680RD, IRDye 680LT can be used to optimize signals in the 700 channel. Dilution range 1:20,000 – 1:40,000. Note: optimization may be required with IRDye 680LT.

Application IRDye 800CW
Secondaries
IRDye 680RD
Secondaries
IRDye 680LT
Secondaries
Western Blot
In-Cell Western™ Assay Not Recommended
On-Cell Western Assay Not Recommended
Protein Array
Immunohistochemistry
Microscopy
2D Gel Detection
Tissue Section Imaging
Small Animal Imaging Not Recommended
Virus Titration Assay Not Known Not Known
FRET-based Assay Not Known Not Known


Note: Now, as of December 15, 2014, you can also get 0.1 mg sizes of all of our IRDye dye-labeled secondary antibodies. Check out our complete listing here and our new filtering tool!

Is DNA Gel Documentation Important to You?

If so, do you know that the Odyssey® Fc Dual-Mode Imaging System now offers you the advantage of imaging DNA gels stained with ethidium bromide (EtBr), SYBR® Safe, and many other DNA stains using the 600 nm channel? How about that for multi-functionality?!

DNA or nucleic acid gel documentation is a common technique performed in the lab. Ethidium bromide is a common DNA stain. But, like many, if you are using SYTO® 60 as a near-infrared fluorescent DNA stain, then you can image your nucleic acid gel in the 700 nm channel of the Odyssey CLx, Odyssey Sa, OR Odyssey Fc. The detection sensitivity and lower limit of detection for SYTO 60 with any of these Odyssey imaging systems has proven to be better than with ethidium bromide detected with either a Polaroid camera or a CCD imaging system.

Don’t believe it? Check the data below, we think you may like what you see. In the figure below, DNA Gels imaged on the Odyssey Fc using Ethidium Bromide, SYBR Safe, and SYTO® 60. The Ethidium Bromide gel was also documented using Polaroid to show the comparison.
DNA Gels imaged on the Odyssey Fc using Ethidium Bromide, SYBR Safe and SYTO 60. All were imaged on the Odyssey Fc Imaging System.

Check out our technical notes on DNA gel documentation:
Imaging Nucleic Acid Gels on the Odyssey Fc Imaging System
SYTO 60 Staining of Nucleic Acids in Gels

Reprobe Fluorescent Westerns with NewBlot™ Western Blot Stripping Buffers

NewBlot Stripping Buffer IconNewBlot Western Blot Stripping Buffers are specially formulated for use with IRDye® infrared dyes (680RD, 680LT, and 800CW only) and the Odyssey® Infrared Imaging Systems to help you save time and money on recreating samples. NewBlot Stripping Buffer allows you to reuse the same blot by stripping and reprobing up to two fluorescent antibodies simultaneously.

So, you may ask, what’s so great about NewBlot Stripping Buffer?

  • Effectively removes antibodies, yet gentle enough to retain immobilized proteins
  • Strips blots at room temperature in 20 minutes or less without an unpleasant odor
  • Allows you to reuse the same blot up to 3X! (see the data below!)
  • Offers qualitative analysis after stripping

In the example below, beta tubulin and ERK2 were run on a gel and transferred to Immobilon®-FL PVDF membrane. They were probed with primary antibodies rabbit anti-beta-tubulin and mouse anti-ERK2 and then with IRDye 680 Goat anti-Rabbit (red) and IRDye 800CW Goat anti-Mouse (green), respectively. NewBlot PVDF Stripping Buffer was used to strip the blot, which was then reprobed with the fluorescent secondary antibodies. This was repeated 2 more times. As you can see from the series of images, there is very little apparent loss of signal in either channel in the third blot as compared to the original blot.
Example of using NewBlot Stripping Buffer on PVDF Membranes

NewBlot is available in two ‘flavors’: one for stripping nitrocellulose membranes and the other for stripping PVDF membranes.

Get more power out of your blot with NewBlot Western Blot Stripping Buffers!

Note: On August 25, 2014, we launched two new Western blot stripping buffers: NewBlot™ IR Stripping Buffer for infrared Western blots on either PVDF OR nitrocellulose membranes; and, WesternSure® ECL Stripping Buffer for chemiluminescent Western blot stripping and reprobing. BOTH do not require hazardous shipping charges, unlike many other Western stripping buffers.

NEW! COX IV Primary Antibody Offers Normalization for Low-Expressing Proteins

COX IV Rabbit Monoclonal Primary Antibody, PN 926-42214The COX IV primary antibody can be used for detection of COX IV by Western blot, or as a normalization antibody when performing two-color detection. Its target molecular weight is 17 kDa. Detection of this primary antibody can be achieved with IRDye® Goat Anti-Rabbit or IRDye Donkey Anti-Rabbit secondary antibodies. LI-COR® also carries beta-actin, alpha-tubulin, and beta-tubulin primary antibodies for normalization when performing quantitative Western blots or In-Cell Western Assays.

Western Blot Linearity of COX IV vs. Actin in Cell Lysate

Figure 1. Linearity comparison of COX IV rabbit monoclonal primary antibody (P/N 926-42214) to β-Actin rabbit monoclonal (P/N 926-42210). Primary antibodies were compared by Western blot and detected with IRDye 800CW Goat anti-Rabbit (P/N 926-32211). The COX IV antibody can be used as a mitochondrial loading control and a loading control for normalizing low expressing target proteins. This COX IV primary antibody remains linear with increasing concentrations of lysate, making it ideal for normalization.

COX IV Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Pack Insert

Use IRDye® Labeled Oligonucleotides for Safer, Faster Fluorescent Gel Shift Assays

The EMSA (electrophoretic mobility shift assay) is used to study protein:DNA complexes and interactions. Protein:DNA complexes migrate more slowly than unbound linear DNA on a non-denaturing gel, causing a “shift.”

Also called “gel shift” or “gel retardation” assays, EMSA can be used to analyze sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by proteins.

Traditional, radioactive EMSA protocols can be easily adapted to near-infrared fluorescence EMSA detection by using IRDye end-labeled oligonucleotides and imaging with the Odyssey® CLx or Odyssey Classic Infrared Imaging System, providing a safe and sensitive alternative.

Comparison of Detection Methods for Fluorescent Gel Shift Assay

For more information on the EMSA workflow and a sample protocol for infrared fluorescent mobility shift assays, visit our website.