Journal Articles Citing Use of Odyssey® or Pearl® Imaging Systems and Near-Infrared Fluorescence

The following are 4 journal references citing the use of either Odyssey or Pearl Imaging Systems.

Affibody-DyLight Conjugates for in vivoAssessment of HER2 Expression by Near-Infrared Optical Imaging.

Zielinski R, M Hassan, I Lyakhov, D Needle, V Chernomordik, A Garcia-Glaessner, Y Ardeshirpour, J Capala and A Gandjbakhche
Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
PLoS ONE 7(7): e41016 (2012). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041016

The HER2/neu gene is overexpressed in ~20% of invasive breast carcinomas. in vivo assessment of HER2 levels would aid development of HER2-targeted therapies and perhaps assist in selection of appropriate treatment strategies. This study describes HER2-specific probes for in vivo monitoring of receptor levels by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging. Affibody molecules were labeled with DyLight750 dye, and affinity and specificity were confirmed in vitro. in vivo, Affibody-DyLight probes accumulated in HER2-positive breast cancer xenografts, but not in HER2-negative xenografts.

Fluorescent images were acquired at different time intervals after probe injection.
Fluorescent images were acquired at different time intervals after probe injection. Mouse bearing BT-474 xenograft tumor was injected with 10 µg HER2-Affibody-DyLight750 conjugate. Images were acquired every second for 1 minute with Pearl Impulse Imager (LI-COR Biosciences). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041016.s004

Animals were imaged with a custom NIR fluorescence-lifetime imaging system. The Pearl® Impulse Imager (LI-COR Biosciences) was used to monitor real-time accumulation of the Affibody probe in HER2-positive tumors during very early time points. Probe was injected during image acquisition, and images were captured every second for 1 minute. Probe accumulation in the kidney first, followed by tumor accumulation. Tumor fluorescence could still be detected 5 days after probe injection. This Affibody conjugate is useful for preclinical monitoring of HER2 status, and may have clinical utility.

Disruption of Kv1.3 Channel Forward Vesicular Trafficking by Hypoxia in Human T Lymphocytes

AA Chimote, Z Kuras, and L Conforti
Departments of Internal Medicine and Molecular & Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
Journal of Biological Chemistry 287(3): 2055-67 (2012) DOI 10.1074/jbc.M111.274209

In solid tumors, hypoxia decreases immune surveillance. Kv1.3 channels on T lymphocytes are down-regulated by an unknown mechanism, inhibiting T cell function. The authors hypothesize that changes in membrane trafficking cause reduced expression of Kv1.3 at the cell surface. On-Cell Western cell based assays (Odyssey® Imager, LI-COR Biosciences) were extensively used to measure cell surface expression of Kv1.3.

Chronic hypoxia decreased cell surface expression of Kv1.3 in Jurkat cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis, degradation, or endocytosis did not block this effect. However, inhibition of forward trafficking in the trans-Golgi with brefeldin A (BFA) prevented hypoxia-induced reduction of Kv1.3 cell surface expression. Confocal microscopy confirmed retention of Kv1.3 in the trans-Golgi. Quantitative fluorescent Westerns (Odyssey Imager) demonstrated that expression of AP-1, which is required for clathrin-coated vesicle formation, is downregulated by hypoxia. These data indicate that chronic hypoxia disrupts clathrin-mediated forward trafficking of Kv1.3, thereby reducing immune surveillance by T cells.

Sequential Application of Anticancer Drugs Enhances Cell Death by Rewiring Apoptotic Signaling Networks

M Lee, A Ye, A Gardino, A Hheijink, P Sorger, G MacBeath, and M Yaffe
Dept of Biology, David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
Cell 149:780-794 (2012). doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.03.031

Historically, standard treatments for human malignancies have been single drug therapies that cause DNA damage. Systems-based approaches and network analysis are now being used to examine how signaling can be re-wired by drug treatments that target dynamic network states. This study suggests that the timing and order of administration of certain drug combinations increases treatment effectiveness. Lee et al. pre-treated cells with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, prior to DNA-damaging chemotherapy drugs.

Pre-treatment with erlotinib (an EGFR inhibitor) sensitized triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) to the DNA damage agent doxorubicin, and cell death increased by nearly 500%. Sensitization occurred only if the drugs were given sequentially. Transcriptional, proteomic, and computational analysis of signaling networks showed that dynamic network re-wiring was responsible for sensitization. Quantitative Westerns (Odyssey Imager; high-density, 48-sample blots) were used to monitor systems-level signaling dynamics. Erlotinib treatment made cells more susceptible to DNA damage by reactivating an apoptotic pathway that had been suppressed.

Investigation of Ovarian Cancer Associated Sialylation Changes in N-linked Glycopeptides by Quantitative Proteomics

V Shetty, J Hafner, P Shah, Z Nickens, and R Philip
Immunotope, Inc., Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA
Clinical Proteomics 9:10 (2012) doi:10.1186/1559-0275-9-10.

CA125 is currently used as a biomarker for ovarian cancer, but is ineffective for detection of early stage disease. Previous research indicates that the level of sialic acid in total serum of ovarian cancer patients is elevated. Based on that idea, the authors suggest using N-linked sialyated glycopeptides as potential targets for early stage ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

Shetty et al. used Lectin-directed Tandem Lableing (LTL) and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics to investigate N-linked sialyated glycopeptides, and identified 10 that were up-regulated in serum from ovarian cancer patients. Quantitative Western blot analysis of lectin-enriched glycoproteins (Odyssey Imager) was used to confirm the proteomic analysis. In ovarian cancer, increased sialylation of haptoglobin, PON1, and Zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein was observed. Cancer-specific sialylation of glycopeptides may be a target for biomarker discovery.

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Cells in Suspension for Quantitative Cell Signaling Analysis using In-Cell Western™ Assays

In-Cell Western Assays - Fluorescent Immunoassays

So I’ve talked about how to ensure that suspension cells attach to plates, when to know you have a monolayer, and why round bottom plates are the best when doing In-Cell Western Assays with suspension cells in the 23-May-12 blog post. On 29-May-12 post, the post discussed how to wash your microplates so that you don’t lose cells plus some troubleshooting tips. I hope you found both of those posts helpful.

Here is the last post in this series on using non-adherent cells for ICW assays. These are a few additional questions you may have about using suspension cells for this powerful immunofluorescent assay.

  1. What suspension cell lines have been tested for use in In-Cell Westerns?
    Suspension cell lines tested include Jurkat, K-562, and THP-1.
  2. What pathways have been tested?
    Pathways tested include ERK activation and apoptosis using cleaved caspase-3 as a marker (Figure 1). A sample protocol can be downloaded here.

Do you have other questions? Super! Please contact us and let us know how we can help you in your research. And stop by this blog again for more technical tips and troubleshooting hints on other applications.

Anisomycin induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Cells

Figure 1. Anisomycin-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. The image represents a 96-well two-color In-Cell Western assay with the 700 and 800 nm channels detecting TO-PRO®-3 DNA staining and cleaved caspase-3 (Asp175), respectively. The image was scanned using the Odyssey® Sa Infrared Imaging system with scan setting of 200 μm resolution, focus offset of 3.5, and intensity of 3.5 (700 channel) and 4 (800 channel). Background (B) wells were incubated with a secondary antibody but no primary antibody. The graph represents normalized quantitative data demonstrating the increase in caspase-3 cleavage in response to anisomycin treatment for 3 hours in Jurkat cells.

Additional resources:
In-Cell Western Assays: FAQs when Using Suspension Cells
Complete Sample Protocol for PMA-Induced ERK Activation in Suspension Cell Lines
LI-COR BIO Website

Scientists using Quantitative Western blotting and Odyssey® Infrared Imagers

The Odyssey Family of Imaging SystemsThere are over 4000 peer-reviewed journal articles in which scientists have cited the use of LI-COR products and imaging systems for all types of research – from apoptosis, autophagy, and angiogenesis to RNAi studies, transcription factor assays, and virology – and many disciplines inbetween.

Here is a review of a recent publication in which quantitative Western blots were performed on the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System.

High-Content Chemical and RNAi Screens for Suppressors of Neurotoxicity in a Huntington’s Disease Model

Joost Schulte, Katharine J. Sepp, Chaohong Wu, Pengyu Hong, J. Troy Littleton
Dept of Biology, Dept of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

PLoS ONE 6(8): e23841 (2011)

Huntington’s Disease (HD), a dominant neurodegenerative disorder, results from expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the Huntingtin (Htt) protein. This study describes a high-content small molecule and RNAi screen for suppressors of neurotoxicity, using a Drosophila primary neural culture HD model. An mRFP-tagged pathogenic Huntingtin variant (Htt138Q) was expressed to induce disease phenotypes. Suppressors of neurotoxicity were identified, including lkb1 (an upstream kinase in the mTOR/insulin pathway) and four drugs (Camptothecin, OH-Camptothecin, 18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid, and Carbenoxolone). Quantitative Western blotting with the Odyssey Imager was used to monitor expression of Htt variants, and for in vivo validation of screen hits. The suppressors identified in this screen also restored viability in an in vivo Drosophila HD model.

If you would like to see more references, check out our publications database. Search by instrument, area of research, application and country to get a personalized list of publications related to your research.

Updated November 20, 2017.

Advantages of using PSVue® 794 for Imaging Apoptosis

PSVue® 794 is a near-infrared fluorescent probe for detection of apoptotic and necrotic cells, bacteria, and other anionic membranes. The compound exhibits fluorescence excitation maximum at 794nm and emission maximum at 810 nm and through its zinc(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) moiety, it has been found to bind strongly to negatively charged bacterial cell walls (e.g. S. aureus, E. coli) and necrotic regions present in various tumors (e.g. mammary, prostate, glioma) in vitro and in vivo. In particular, it has also been found to bind to the phosphatidylserine (PS) residues exposed on the cell surface of apoptotic cells, making it a more cost-effective alternative to fluorescently-labeled Annexin V in various cell death assays.

Figure 1. MPTP was used to induce cell death in mouse brains as a model for Parkinson’s Disease. C57BI/6 mice were treated with MPTP to selectively destroy dopaminergic neurons. Mice were then injected with PSVue dye or control dye and imaged on the Pearl® Imager 68 hrs post injection. A. control (i.e. non-targeting) dye; B. and C. PSVue dye; D. excised brains from the three animals.

Download a scientific poster presenting information on the use of PSvue 794 in studying Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Diesase, and contact dermatitis in mouse models.

For more near-infrared fluorescent probes, learn about BrightSite™ Small Animal Imaging Agents and CellVue® Burgundy Fluorescent and CellVue NIR Fluorescent Cell Labeling Kits.