Avoid Milk Blocking Buffer – Use NEW! Odyssey® Blocking Buffer (TBS)

Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS)

In previous posts, we’ve talked about Western blot blocking buffers and how important it is to optimize your blocking conditions to get the best results. As many of Western blot users do, you may just routinely use homemade TBS-milk blocking buffer. It’s inexpensive, and it does the job. . . well, most of the time. . .

What you may not know is using milk blocking buffer can cause issues with certain targets. This may give you the wrong information about the presence or the amount of your target. One good way to determine which blocking buffer system to use is to check to see what the primary antibody vendor recommends. Most recommend TBS-based buffer systems. If the primary antibody requires a TBS-based buffer system, we recommend new Odyssey® Blocking Buffer (TBS).

When should you avoid milk blocking buffer?

  • When using anti-goat secondary antibodies.
    • Reason: Milk contains bovine IgG. Anti-goat secondary antibodies may recognize bovine IgG, resulting in high background.
  • When detecting phosphorylated proteins.
    • Reason: Milk contains phosphorylated proteins, which may result in low to no signal and high background.
  • When using streptavidin-biotin detection systems.
    • Reason: Milk contains endogenous levels of biotin. Streptavidin will detect this, resulting in high background.

OBB TBS and milkHere are the results of an experiment evaluating the use of milk and Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS). As you can see, milk masked the detection of this protein and is not a good blocking buffer choice.

Figure 1. Effect of various blocking agents on detection of pAkt and total Akt in Jurkat lysate after stimulation by calyculin A. Total and phosphorylated Akt were detected in calyculin A-stimulated (+) and non-stimulated (-) Jurkat lysate at 10 µg; 5 µg; and 2.5 µg/well. Blots were probed with pAkt Rabbit mAb (Santa Cruz P/N sc‑135650) and Akt mAb (CST P/N 2967) and detected with IRDye® 800CW Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (LI‑COR P/N 926-32211) and IRDye 680RD Goat anti-Mouse IgG (LI‑COR P/N 926‑68070); scanned on Odyssey® CLx (auto scan 700 & 800). pAkt (green) is only detected with Odyssey Blocking Buffer (TBS).

So be sure to optimize your Western blot blocking conditions! The time you spend finding the best blocker will be worth it – and save you from making the wrong conclusions about your experimental data in the future.

Multiplex Western Blotting System Turbo-Charges Western Blot Results Output

Example of Multiplex Western Blotting using the MPX Blotting SystemMultiplex Western blotting is a powerful tool that allows you to get more out of your Western blots. Multiplex detection becomes possible when you utilize the MPX™ (Multiplex) Blotting System and LI-COR IRDye® near-infrared fluorescent dye-labeled secondary antibodies.

Multiplex Westerns can be imaged on any of the Odyssey® Imagers and provide results for a possible maximum of 48 targets on a single membrane — 24 per channel with two-color detection — and the option for quantitative analysis, saving you time and reagents! The MPX Blotting System can be used if you need to optimize:

  • Primary antibodies – to determine the primary antibody that has the right specificity and the right dilution for use
  • Antibody incubation times
  • Blocking conditions – which blocking buffer will give you the optimum results
  • Secondary antibodies – what dilutions is best to use without getting a lot of non-specific binding?
  • Or just about anything else you need to optimize!

Watch this 4 minute video on how easy it is to get the most out of multiplexing with the MPX Blotting System. You can also download the handy MPX Blotter User Guide.