What if Film Was No Longer Available? How Would You Capture Your Western Blot Images?

Photographic FilmFilm has been the dominant technology for capturing images for photographers, medical practitioners, and researchers for more than 250 years. Now it’s no longer the sole option. Digital technologies are beginning to impact the future of film. Here’s how and why:

  1. Digital technology is being widely adopted across many different fields including photography, medicine, and scientific research.
  2. The affordability and supply of film has been threatened with the increase of raw material and production costs.
  3. New rules and regulations have been passed in relation to global preservation and green movements.

Because of this, several prominent companies including Kodak and Fujifilm have reevaluated their business initiatives and made decisions regarding the manufacture of certain film-related products.

Get out of the DarkroomIn addition, many universities and institutions are reconsidering their rules and regulations for the disposal and use of hazardous wastes. In general, policies are being made more stringent and punishments for non-compliance more severe. In fact, many new research and medical buildings are being built without darkrooms or the equipment necessary to process film.

Being aware of how these issues, and others, affect the future of film is essential to being able to continue the same quality, or better quality work than you are producing now. Preparing for the future by considering alternative imaging options is becoming more and more essential—especially when processing film comes with additional expenditures and concerns, and requires protocols that rely on toxic chemicals and large amounts of water.

Our next blog post will show you how the cost of raw materials influences the availability and cost of film.

Related Posts:

  • What is the Future of Film Use for Western Blot Imaging?
  • The History of Film. What Does It Tell Us About The Future of Using Film for Western Blot Imaging?