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Month: July 2007

Using 5 Volt (or larger) Sensors with the LI-1400 Datalogger

Using 5 Volt (or larger) Sensors with the LI-1400 Datalogger

The 1400-301 terminal block has sensor inputs for 4 voltage channels (V1-V4) and 2 current channels (I4 and I5). The 4 voltage channels have an input range of ±2.5 volts. Many of our users would like to use sensors with a wider voltage range (e.g. ±5V) with the LI-1400. A little-known feature of the 1400-301 terminal block is that current channels I4 and I5 can be configured for voltage measurement by changing a jumper on the back of the terminal…

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Interfacing LI-COR Radiation Sensors with Campbell Scientific Dataloggers

Interfacing LI-COR Radiation Sensors with Campbell Scientific Dataloggers

Many of our users like to interface LI-COR radiation sensors with dataloggers from Campbell Scientific. LI-COR can provide millivolt adapters for use with our type “SA” radiation sensors; these adapters have a BNC connector that mates with the sensor, and are terminated with bare wire leads for connection to the datalogger. If a differential measurement is used for your LI-COR radiation sensor that is not referenced to the…

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Lead-Acid Battery Maintenance and Service

Lead-Acid Battery Maintenance and Service

LI-COR lead-acid batteries: 6400-03, 3000B, 6200B, 6000B

Batteries must be stored fully charged and in a cool place, if possible. For long term storage, place the batteries on the charger overnight every three months.

Charging the batteries:
Batteries are normally charged with the LI-6020 battery changer. Make sure that the voltage selector slide switch on the back of the LI-6020 battery charger is set to the appropriate line voltage (115 or 230 VAC).

The AC indicator light will illuminate…

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LI-8100 Measurement Settings & Techniques

LI-8100 Measurement Settings & Techniques

LI-COR receives many calls asking how best to configure their LI-8100 measurement protocol. A typical survey or long-term measurement should consist of an observation length of 1.5 to 2.5 minutes, and a deadband of 20-30 seconds. Remember that observation length is the length of time that the chamber is on the collar, and the deadband is the amount of time specified to ensure steady mixing in the chamber. Other parameters, such as the number of observations, observation delay, purge time,…

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The LI-7500… Riding With “Miss Piggy”

The LI-7500… Riding With “Miss Piggy”

As another hurricane season approches, few of us will soon forget the devastation wrought by such recent storms with now-familiar names like Isabel, Fabian, Rita, and of course, Katrina. Anyone in the path of one of these killer storms can appreciate the work that a number of hurricane researchers perform; work that helps forecasters predict hurricane intensity, and when and where the hurricane will make landfall.

A variety of specially equipped National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) aircraft are used…

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