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Month: February 2012

LI-6400XT System Tech Tip: Dealing with Large Moist Samples

LI-6400XT System Tech Tip: Dealing with Large Moist Samples

With large chambers such as the 6400-24 Bryophyte Chamber, the 6400-05 and 6400-22 Conifer Chambers, or a large custom chamber, it is possible to measure large samples.  An advantage of large samples is that larger CO2 differentials are possible, even at lower photosynthesis rates, leading to higher precision in the photosynthesis measurement.  With large moist samples in the chamber however, not only is delta CO2 larger, but chamber humidity will also be higher.

Typically, we recommend maintaining chamber relative humidity…

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Adjusting the LI-8150 Flow Rate

Adjusting the LI-8150 Flow Rate

First generation LI-8150 multiplexers, which used a rotary vane pump, provided an adjustable flow rate of 2 to 4 LPM. This functionality was lost when the LI-8150 was upgraded to the more rugged diaphragm pump. However, control over the multiplexer flow rate can be restored through a simple hardware modification. This is accomplished by replacing the quick connect coupling on the LI-8150 pump inlet with a quick connect needle valve (part number 300-09658), installing a flow meter, and adjusting the…

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FLUXNET Takes a Look at Sites Measuring Methane Emissions

FLUXNET Takes a Look at Sites Measuring Methane Emissions

The January 2012 issue of FluxLetter-The Newsletter of Fluxnet-focuses on methane flux measurements within the FLUXNET community. This issue includes profiles of several wetland and peatland research sites around the world where scientists measure methane emissions. It provides a list of other methane flux research sites, as well as the habitat type, the year measurements began and the instrumentation at each site. Click here to read more about the fascinating research taking place at these sites.

Enviscope project uses airborne method to detect ship plume pollution

Enviscope project uses airborne method to detect ship plume pollution

Ships are large emission sources of pollutants. According to a recent report, ship emissions of sulfur and NOx in Europe are projected to exceed the land based emissions by 2020. To detect these emissions, Enviscope GmbH and scientists from Chalmers University are working together on an airborne project. Their project detects ship plume pollution by flying over the ships and measuring their exhaust plume.  Read more about the airborne Enviscope project here.